fix template/shortcode here later

Screen Assist Controller Summary 1

Music Stored Locally

(new terminal Ctrl+Alt+T) (maximise Ctrl+Alt+up)

/home/pi/Desktop/ThailandTunes.mp3.xspf

cd ~/Music

“Hey Google, set a timer for 10 minutes”

pico2wave -w oktimer10.wav “OK Google, set a timer for 10 minutes.” && aplay oktimer10.wav

“Hey Google, set a pizza timer for 12 minutes”

“Hey Google, set an alarm for 8.30 tomorrow morning”

pico2wave -w okalarm830.wav “OK Google, set an alarm for 8.30 tomorrow morning” && aplay okalarm830.wav

pico2wave -w okalarm830.wav “Hey Google, set an alarm for 8.30 tomorrow morning” && aplay okalarm830.wav

“Hey Google, snooze alarm”

pico2wave -w oksalarm.wav “OK Google, snooze alarm” && aplay oksalarm.wav

“Hey Google, cancel my alarm for 8.30”

“Hey Google, what time is it?”

pico2wave -w oktime.wav “OK Google, what time is it?” && aplay oktime.wav

calendar.google.com/calendar/b/1/r?pli=1

“Hey Google, what does my day look like?”

pico2wave -w okdaylike.wav “OK Google, what does my day look like?” && aplay okdaylike.wav”

Hey Google, what’s on my schedule for Friday?”

pico2wave -w okschedulefriday.wav “OK Google, what’s on my schedule for Friday?”” && aplay okschedulefriday.wav
“Hey Google, where is my first event?”

pico2wave -w okfirstevent.wav “OK Google, where is my first event?” && aplay okfirstevent.wav
“Hey Google, remind me to take the charity clothes out tomorrow at 8am”

pico2wave -w okremindtom830.wav “OK Google, remind me to take the charity clothes out tomorrow at 8am” && aplay okremindtom830.wav

“Hey Google, what are my reminders?”

pico2wave -w okreminders.wav “OK Google, what are my reminders?” && aplay okreminders.wav

“Hey Google, remember that I left the spare keys in the dish in the kitchen”

pico2wave -w okremember.wav “OK Google, remember that I left the spare keys in the dish in the kitchen”” && aplay okremember.wav

“Hey Google, where did I put the spare keys?”

“Hey Google, delete my reminder to take the charity clothes out tomorrow”
“Hey Google, tell me what my next task is with Todoist”

“Hey Google, what are my notifications?”
“Hey Google, what’s the weather like today?”
“Hey Google, show me the weather on [Chromecast name]”
“Hey Google, do I need an umbrella tomorrow?”
“Hey Google, what’s the traffic like on the way to work?”
“Hey Google, how long will it take to get to Soho Theatre?”
“Hey Google, how long will it take to get to Brixton Academy from work?”
“Hey Google, good morning” [daily briefing]
“Hey Google, what’s today’s news?”
“Hey Google, did Chelsea win?”
“Hey Google, what’s grapefruit in French?”
“Hey Google, how do you make a Singapore Sling?”
“Hey Google, how do you make mushroom risotto?”
“Hey Google, what’s 100 pounds in euros?”
“Hey Google, spell manoeuvre”
“Hey Google, how late is Wahaca open?”
“Hey Google, is Marks & Spencer open now?”
“Hey Google, are there any Mexican restaurants around here?”
“Hey Google, how many calories are in a courgette?”
“Hey Google, flip a coin”

“Hey Google, turn on bedroom light”
“Hey Google, set the kitchen lights to 50%”
“Hey Google, dim the living room lights”
“Hey Google, brighten the office lamp”
“Hey Google, turn the living room lights to blue”
“Hey Google, play Honest Trailers on Chromecast”
“Hey Google, play Mudbound on Netflix”
“Hey Google, play House of Cards on TV”
“Hey Google, set the heating to 22 degrees”
“Hey Google, raise the temperature three degrees”
“Hey Google, what’s the temperature?”
“Hey Google, turn on all the switches”
“Hey Google, read my book on lounge speaker” [Chromecast Audio]
“Hey Google, lock the front door”

“Hey Google, go to ambient” [screensaver]
“Hey Google, go home”
“Hey Google, go back”
“Hey Google, turn the screen off”
“Hey Google, turn it up/turn it down”
“Hey Google, open YouTube”

“Hey Google, call Amy”

“Hey Google, call the Brockley Barge”

“Hey Google, hang up”

“Hey Google, redial”

“Hey Google, help”

“Hey Google, order an Uber”

“Hey Google, order me a Domino’s pizza”

“Hey Google, broadcast breakfast is ready” [plays message on all speakers]

“Hey Google, what sound does a horse make?”

“Hey Google, what’s on my shopping list?”

“Hey Google, add dishwasher tablets to my shopping list”

“Hey Google, tell me something interesting”

“Hey Google, talk to Product Hunt”

Using Assistant to do the same few things all the time can be tedious, but Routines might be able to help. This feature allows you to connect multiple actions to a single command. There are only a few pre-determined routine commands right now, but they could still save you a lot of time.

To get started, open the Assistant settings and scroll down to Routines. In this menu, Google provides six pre-loaded commands: good morning, bedtime, I’m leaving (leaving home), I’m home, let’s go to work, and let’s go home. Say any of those, and you’ll trigger the associated Routine. Each one includes a few customization options including smart home devices, travel info, and audio playback. You can also modify the trigger phrase at the top of the Routine settings page.

Ryan Whitwam/IDG

If Google’s pre-loaded routines aren’t doing what you want, you can also create a completely custom routine from scratch. Go to Routines under the Assistant settings, but don’t tap on the “Ready-made” options. Instead, hit the plus button down at the bottom to make a custom routine.

You’ll need to enter at least one trigger phrase to start. Then, add actions either by typing in commands or using the “Popular actions” list. Being able to input text means you can have your routine do anything you could do manually in Assistant. Remember to add a custom response to your routine so you know it triggered correctly, too. You can also have Assistant play media like podcasts, music, and sleep sounds at the end of a routine.

If Google’s pre-loaded routines aren’t doing what you want, you can also create a completely custom routine from scratch. Go to Routines under the Assistant settings, but don’t tap on the “Ready-made” options. Instead, hit the plus button down at the bottom to make a custom routine.

You’ll need to enter at least one trigger phrase to start. Then, add actions either by typing in commands or using the “Popular actions” list. Being able to input text means you can have your routine do anything you could do manually in Assistant. Remember to add a custom response to your routine so you know it triggered correctly, too. You can also have Assistant play media like podcasts, music, and sleep sounds at the end of a routine.

Assistant launched with a single-tasking approach. You told it one thing to do, and it would either do that thing or tell you it didn’t know how to help. If you had more requests for Assistant, you’d start over with a new command. Google has quietly added support for multiple actions in a single command, but it won’t work on everything.

You can give this a shot right now by stringing two commands together. For example, “Turn off the lights and give tomorrow’s forecast.” Assistant will do both without a second command. Unfortunately, you can’t use routines or shortcuts with multiple commands. In addition, this feature is only live on the Google Home version of Assistant. It won’t work on your phone.

Google was famously slow to add reminder support to Google Home, but it’s been there for a while. More recently, Google expanded reminder functionality to understand location. Your Google Home doesn’t move, of course, but your phone does.

 

When you add a reminder via Assistant on Home or your phone, consider adding a location. For example, “Remind me to buy milk when I go to [a grocery store].” The reminder won’t appear on Google Home because it doesn’t go anyplace with you, but your phone will ping you when it detects you’re in the right place.

“ok google, what is this song?”

pico2wave -w okwhatsong.wav “ok google, what is this song?” && aplay okwhatsong.wav

Wondering what that vaguely familiar song playing in the background is? Google Assistant is probably the fastest way to find out. On your phone, long-press the home button to launch Assistant, and you might have a contextual button that says “What’s this song?” That only appears when Assistant hears music in the background. If it doesn’t show up, you can say/type that phrase to launch the recognition.

Assistant listens for a few seconds, and then returns a match.You’ll get the song, artist, album, lyrics, and links to listen to it online.

“ok google, sync my devices”

Google Assistant supports numerous smart home devices, but you might notice that devices you’ve just added to your account don’t always work right away. That’s because Assistant isn’t constantly scanning for new connections. You can give it a kickstart.

After adding a new smart home device like a camera or thermostat, open up Assistant and say, “Sync my devices.” Assistant tells you it’s syncing with your connected accounts, and a few seconds later any newly added devices will appear in your list. Make sure to add them to rooms in Assistant for full functionality.

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“ok google, remember that I parked in green bay 10 on level 1”

# (location)

Your squishy human brain is fallible, but Google Assistant can remember things without fail. All you have to do is ask it. You can tell Assistant to remember things just by saying “Remember that [some piece of information].” You could tell Google to remember where you parked, what you did with the spare house key, your high score in Tetris, or anything else. As a handy bonus, Assistant also saves maps when you tell it where you parked.

Later, you can ask Google to recall the information in various ways. You can be direct, like asking Assistant “Where did I park?” You can recall factoids you’ve saved with “What did I say about [x]?” or “Remind me about [x].”

“ok google, show me the photos I took in Barcelona”

Google Photos is a fantastic backup solution for all your snapshots. Google offers unlimited storage of images and videos, provided you’re okay with a little compression, and Pixel owners get free full-quality backups. If you want to look for specific photos you’ve taken, you can do it right from Google Assistant. All you have to do is ask.

Assistant plugs into the amazing search capabilities of Google Photos, so you can ask to see almost anything. You can ask Assistant to pull up pictures of specific people, locations, and even objects. Tap the image results to scroll through them immediately, or open Google Photos via the shortcut under your pics. Just make sure you preface your request with something like “my photos”  to ensure you get images from your Google Photos library rather than images from a Google search.

“ok google, take a screenshot”

“ok google, share a screenshot.”

You can capture screenshots on Android phones by holding the power and volume buttons, but Assistant can do it, too. In fact, it might be faster if you intend to share the screenshot right away. Open Assistant and say, “take a screenshot” or “share a screenshot.”

It takes a moment to capture the screenshot, but you’ll get a preview as soon as it’s done. Assistant then immediately brings up the sharing interface so you can send the screen to a message or upload it someplace. The screenshots taken via Assistant aren’t saved locally, so you won’t end up with clutter from repeated screenshot captures.

Google Assistant first appeared in the Allo app, and in that iteration, you could input text to “chat” with the Google’s bot. But the more powerful baked-in phone version of Assistant began its life with only voice input. That’s fine when you’re in a situation where you can talk to your phone, but voice dictation isn’t always appropriate. Well, you can type your questions and commands, too.

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To create a shortcut, go to the Assistant settings and open the settings. Scroll down and tap on the Shortcuts option. The shortcut screen has a box for what you want to say, and one below that for what you want Assistant to actually do in response.

In the top box, input whatever snappy shortcut phrase you want. It tends to work better if you use the microphone button to speak the shortcut. Assistant will sometimes put a sample command in the bottom box, but you can change that to the command you want. It has to be the full phrase you’d say to Assistant, including the “Tell [X]” part if needed. Once your shortcut is saved, it’ll work by voice and text.

“Add [item name] to my shopping list.”

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